(Source: best-of-memes, via heyfunniest)

Color doodle

Color doodle

Tags: doodle

fuckinginbrooklyn:

25K retweets and I’ve lost count of how many death threats. Keep reposting. #Ferguson #Racism #Progress

fuckinginbrooklyn:

25K retweets and I’ve lost count of how many death threats. Keep reposting. #Ferguson #Racism #Progress

(via questionall)

letlovemoveme:

shiftintothelight:

karlimeaghan:

I love these shows, but by God they have a lot of problems.

The Doctor Who ones especially, but Sherlock too.

Gonna agree with shiftintothelight

camharr:

jessicalprice:

sitrein:

bigbardafree:

image

I seriously hear my female friends saying this at least once a week. It has never made a single bit of sense to me.

It’s a thing said by women who are Not Like Other Women.

It’s a thing said to be One Of The Boys.

wilwheaton:

bearhatalice:

aspiringpolymath:

phoenix-ace:

girl-non-grata:

Please note: “everyone who works retail, admin, or labor” is pretty much everyone. I can’t remember the last time I worked somewhere without “security” cameras that monitored employees.

I’m having a good laugh right now because our associates just got collectively reprimanded for leaning on the counters during 8 hour shifts on their feet, because it isn’t “professional” looking.  So apparently they can put up with a camera over their shoulder to make sure they do their jobs correctly, but a cop with a gun cant?  

Do cops want CCTV cams removed from businesses and streets? If they don’t want to monitored on their jobs, why should everyone be monitored at theirs (and in their LIVES)? Oh, it makes cops’ job easier to have a video record of crimes and infractions? Huh.
HUH.

I work in an office and not retail, but I also know that every website I visit, and instant message or email I send is monitored and stored by my employer.



Also, surveillance cameras in public areas are nearly everywhere in America, watching just about everything completely innocent people are doing.Police should be held to a higher standard than the public they are sworn to protect, and the data shows that cops equipped with cameras are simply better cops.

wilwheaton:

bearhatalice:

aspiringpolymath:

phoenix-ace:

girl-non-grata:

Please note: “everyone who works retail, admin, or labor” is pretty much everyone. I can’t remember the last time I worked somewhere without “security” cameras that monitored employees.

I’m having a good laugh right now because our associates just got collectively reprimanded for leaning on the counters during 8 hour shifts on their feet, because it isn’t “professional” looking.  So apparently they can put up with a camera over their shoulder to make sure they do their jobs correctly, but a cop with a gun cant?  

Do cops want CCTV cams removed from businesses and streets? If they don’t want to monitored on their jobs, why should everyone be monitored at theirs (and in their LIVES)? Oh, it makes cops’ job easier to have a video record of crimes and infractions? Huh.

HUH.

I work in an office and not retail, but I also know that every website I visit, and instant message or email I send is monitored and stored by my employer.

Also, surveillance cameras in public areas are nearly everywhere in America, watching just about everything completely innocent people are doing.

Police should be held to a higher standard than the public they are sworn to protect, and the data shows that cops equipped with cameras are simply better cops.

fandomsandfeminism:

consultingsuperhusbands:

artmesohard:

Many cancer patients can be overwhelmed with the physical and emotional difficulties of their disease, and the loss of their hair from chemotherapy treatment certainly doesn’t help. Henna Heals, a rich community of nearly 150 henna tattoo artists worldwide established by a team of 5 women in Canada, helps women with cancer feel confident and beautiful again by drawing elegant henna crowns on their bare heads:

The intricate patterns that the artists create with all-natural henna paste are a unique and empowering substitute to the hats and wigs that many women use to cover their heads after losing their hair to chemotherapy. “For cancer patients, the henna crowns really are a healing experience,” claims Frances Darwin, the founder of Henna Heals. “This is all about them reclaiming a part of themselves that would normally be perceived as ill or damaged or not nice to look at and making it more feminine and beautiful.”

The traditional South-Asian temporary tattoos, which are made with 100% natural home-made henna paste, last for around two weeks and have no harmful side-effects. Henna Heals also offers henna services for special events and does belly painting for mother-to-be, but they always donate 10% of their proceeds to compensate the cost of the henna crowns they make for cancer patients.

I could yell ‘cultural appropriation’ right now but I don’t wanna because, fuck yeah, this is a great idea. And I’m gonna tell you why. 

In India, where I come from, in the Hindu community, henna is associated purely with religious or matrimonial ceremonies. During religious festivals, women wear it as a sign of not just celebration, but purity. Again, during weddings, the bride wears henna up to her elbows and up to her ankles, and, traditionally, there is a ‘mehendi (our word for henna that is applied on the skin) ceremony’ where the women dance and sing bawdy wedding songs and bless the new bride with fertility. The darkness of the mehendi is supposed to predict how deep the bond with the new husband will be, because, traditionally, marriages are arranged, so its a bit of a gamble, and women are forced to read signs into every little thing. A practice that is supposed to be for decoration then becomes a way to grade the new bride’s purity, chastity and the future happiness of her marriage. The same association with chastity and purity applies during religious ceremonies.

Whenever I apply mehendi at a someone’s wedding, I always feel a niggling of GUILT, and ANXIETY - for not being the ideal Hindu woman; for being neither chaste, or pure, or even remotely spiritual. And mehendi, despite its prettiness, is also associated with a certain rigid idea of womanhood, motherhood and femininity. I say BREAK THAT.

That’s why this beautiful, beautiful idea is a great way to unhinge leaf-paste (because that’s what it is!) from all sorts of medieval ideas about how women should be womanly. If it helps set anyone free, helps anyone feel pretty and proud, I say go for it.

Because that’s what this is - reclaiming an art practiced in a female space, democratizing it, opening it up, applying it on anyone and everyone, free of moral and value judgement. Bringing it back to the delight possibly felt by women in Asia millenia back when they giggled ‘Ooh, hey lemme draw a flower on you with that cute leaf-paste’. Reclaiming it for us, and for all our uses, in all our different lives. This makes me fiercely happy.

This is really beautiful.

(Source: hennaheals.ca, via adieu-to-you)

amymebberson:

Pocket Princesses 116 - Pests
Please reblog, do not repost
Facebook page

amymebberson:

Pocket Princesses 116 - Pests

Please reblog, do not repost

Facebook page

"I can’t accept that. I can’t accept that there was only one black woman in the entire film, who delivered one line and who we never saw again. I can’t accept that the bad guys were Asian and that although in China, Lucy’s roommate says, “I mean, who speaks Chinese? I don’t speak Chinese!” I can’t accept that in Hercules, which I also saw this weekend, there were no people of color except for Dwayne Johnson himself and his mixed-race wife, whose skin was almost alabaster. I can’t accept that she got maybe two lines and was then murdered. I can’t accept that the “primitive tribe” in Hercules consisted of dark-haired men painted heavily, blackish green, to give their skin (head-to-toe) a darker appearance, so the audience could easily differentiate between good and bad guys by the white vs. dark skin. I can’t accept that during the previews, Exodus: Gods and Kings, a story about Moses leading the Israelite slaves out of Egypt, where not a single person of color is represented, casts Sigourney Weaver and Joel Edgerton to play Egyptians. I can’t accept that in the preview for Kingsman: The Secret Service, which takes place in London, features a cast of white boys and not a single person of Indian descent, which make up the largest non-white ethnic group in London. I can’t accept that in stories about the end of the world and the apocalypse, that somehow only white people survive. I can’t accept that while my daily life is filled with black and brown women, they are completely absent, erased, when I look at a TV or movie screen."

— Olivia Cole - Lucy: Why I’m Tired of Seeing White People on the Big Screen (via noely-g)

(Source: whatwhiteswillneverknow, via fictionwritingtips)

Spaghetti War 2014 tired and full the combatants issue a truce…for now

Spaghetti War 2014 tired and full the combatants issue a truce…for now

Michelle's books

Screamfree Parenting: The Revolutionary Approach to Raising Your Kids by Keeping Your Cool
ScreamFree Marriage: Calming Down, Growing Up, and Getting Closer
Ender's Game
Ender's Game: Speaker for the Dead
Xenocide
Ender's Shadow
Have Space Suit-Will Travel
The Hunger Games
Mockingjay
Catching Fire
Uglies
Pretties
Specials
Extras
Leviathan
Behemoth
The Writing Diet: Write Yourself Right-Size
The Artist's Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity
The Artist's Way Workbook
Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within


Michelle Leisy's favorite books »
}